Mental Health Symposium: ... Identifying Disruptive Campus Behavior

HANDSLOGO

Learn How to Identify and Assist Students
Before They Reach a Crisis Stage

Join us for Day Long Workshop Presented by Dr. Richard James and Dr. Rick Myer on using TASSLE  - a Triage Assessment System for Students in Learning Environments. TASSLE is a powerful tool that can be used in education settings to identify student behaviors that threaten the integrity of the learning environment. TASSLE uses behavioral observations to make an on-site, here-and-now, real-time assessment of a student who is in crisis.

This workshop would benefit higher education staff within the Counseling Center, Dean of Students Office, Housing and Residence Life, Public Safety, as well as other staff who work with students on a regular basis.

 

USING THE TRIAGE ASSESSMENT SYSTEM FOR STUDENTS IN LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS (TASSLE)

 
             

Dr. JamesRichard James, Ph.D.

Dr. Richard “Dick” K. James is a distinguished member of the graduate faculty at the University of Memphis.  Dr. James is considered a leader in the field of Crisis Intervention and the author of one of the leading texts in the field, Crisis Intervention Strategies.  Dr. James has been involved in the training of countless mental health professionals, law enforcement agencies, university staff & faculty in the domain of threat assessment and crisis intervention.  As a tenured faculty member at the University of Memphis, Dr. James has taught numerous graduate courses including Advanced Theories, Group Processes, Parent Training, and Principles of School Counseling.  He coordinates the practicum and intern experiences of over 100 students per year, chairs dissertation committees for over 25 doctoral students, and is a dissertation committee member for an additional 25 doctoral students.  Dr. James is a National Board Counselor Certified in the 97th percentile, a Nationally Certified School Counselor, a TN Board of Healing Arts Licensed Professional Counselor and a Licensed Psychologist in the state of Tennessee.

 

Dr. MyerRick A. Myer, Ph.D.

Dr. Rick A. Myer is a faculty member at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and the Director of the Center for Crisis Intervention and Prevention.  Dr. Myer earned a Master of Divinity degree from Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, KY, and completed his Ph.D. at the University of Memphis.  Dr. Myer has over two decades of experience in the domains of Crisis Intervention and Threat Assessment.  Additionally, Dr. Myer was the recipient of the 2008 Emerald Literati Network Awards of Excellence:  Highly Commended Award for “Human Impact Issues for Crisis Management.”  Dr. Myer is currently co-author on a text in press titled, Not Just a Fire Drill: Crisis Intervention and Prevention on College Campuses (Myer, Mouton, & James), as well as the co-author of several other texts and is one of the developers of the Triage Assessment Model (Myer, Williams, Ottens, & Schmidt).  Dr. Myer currently holds licensure as a Psychologist in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the State of Illinois.

(TASSLE)

TASSLE was developed by Crisis Intervention & Prevention Solutions, Inc. (CIPS) at the request of the University of Memphis housing officers. We were asked to develop an instrument that could identify students who may need support and/or whose behaviors had the potential to significantly disrupt the learning environment. The concern grew out of the need to help professional staff make fair and unbiased decisions regarding students. These decisions ranged from assisting students secure support to ensure their success to removing disruptive students in order to maintain an environment conducive to all students’ learning.

TASSLE (Myer, Rice, Moulton, James, R., Cogdal, & Allen, S. (2007) is an adaptation of the Triage Assessment System (TAS) (Myer, 2001; Myer, Williams, Ottens, & Schmidt, 1991) that has been used extensively in mental health settings. The TAS has been field tested on a variety of groups ranging from psychologists, social workers, nurses, ministers, and crisis line workers to police officers, emergency room hospital staff, graduate counseling students, social workers, ministers, and EMTs. Research on the TAS has found the model to be highly reliable (Slagel, 2009; Blancett, 2008; Conte, 2005; Pazar, 2005; Watters, 1997). A close relative to TASSLE is the Triage Assessment System for Law Enforcement (TACKLE) developed by James, Myer, & Moore (2006). This instrument is used in law enforcement when respond to calls regarding emotionally disturbed and mentally ill people. TACKLE is now being used by police in Maryland and Kansas police jurisdictions.
TASSLE is a powerful tool that can be used in education settings to identify student behaviors that threaten the integrity of the learning environment. TASSLE uses behavioral observations to make an on-site, here-and-now, real-time assessment of a student who is in crisis.